Top image: Dr. George Nash on fieldwork in Northern Italy

Dr. George Nash

As part of an ongoing research project in the north-west, Dr. George Nash, along with colleague Tom Wellicome were commissioned by the Art Gene team to research, survey and excavate an area of coastal dunes along the west coast of Walney Island, Cumbria. The site is owned by BAE Systems and much of it is now a National Nature Reserve managed by Natural England. This HLF-funded community-led project commenced in 2014. The project included the excavation of a World War I practice trench, followed by an earthworks survey of the trenching and a nearby rifle range. This work spurred George to explore elsewhere in western Britain for practice trenching and as a result, Scheduled Monument applications have been submitted for three forgotten sites to Historic England. As part of George’s commitment to Walney, he is currently undertaking research with Art Gene colleague and architect Charlie MacKeith on a project that identifies all the surviving World War I and II installations that are present on Walney.

 

Images below: Dr. George Nash leading the earthwork survey on Walney, for Art Gene’s  Fort Walney, Uncovered  project

Dr. George Nash is a research fellow at the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, an Associate Professor at the Museum of Prehistoric Art (Quaternary and Prehistory Geosciences Centre, Macao, Portugal) and a member of the teaching staff at IPT, Tomar, Portugal. George has been a professional archaeologist for the past 25 years and has undertaken extensive fieldwork on prehistoric rock-art and mobility art in Chile, Denmark, Indonesia, Israel, Malaysia, Norway, Sardinia, Spain and Sweden. He has written and edited many books on prehistoric art and prehistoric monumentality including Status, Exchange and Mobility: Mesolithic Portable Art of Southern Scandinavia (1998), Signifying Place and Space: World Perspectives of Rock-art and Landscape (2000), and European Landscapes of Rock-art (2001), The Figured Landscapes of Rock-art: Looking at Pictures and Place, edited with Christopher Chippindale (2004), The Architecture of Death (2006), Art as Metaphor edited with Aron Mazel and Clive Waddington (2007) and the Archaeology of People and Territoriality (2009). In addition to fieldwork, he has also written and presented programmes on European rock-art and contemporary graffiti for the BBC and independent television.

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Image below: Interview of Dr. George Nash by the BBC at Delancey Park, 2011

Further Reading